05.

Solution/Projection
Implementation

Solution and project implementation is how you would go about initiating a new system to introduce change and strive to reach set goals and targets. Solution and project implementation can be started after strategy development and/or problem solving. It paves the way towards work standardisation as it tests the new system to see how effective it is or how well it solves a problem or bottleneck.

What are key factors in implementing solutions and projects effectively?

At this stage you’re likely to have a strategy or project in mind that you’re ready to put into action. Here are a few important factors/steps to consider before initiating the new system.

  • Set a specific time frame in which you intend to test the new system.

  • Involved staff should be well-trained on the new system and should be on should with set goals and targets.

  • Staff performance feedback is given to ensure protocol for the new system is followed properly to prevent any outlying variables that might affect the end result.

  • Feedback is provided in a helpful and timely manner.

  • Multiple sources of information and data collection are used including self-assessment, observation, supervision, peer reports, team meetings, records etc.

  • Keep an objective view of the new system to keep data and observations as unbiased as possible.

  • Staff understand that the performance assessment process and fidelity measures are the basis of feedback and improvement.

  • Teams maintain measurement strategies and feedback loops to receive and provide information and administrative changes introduced if needed.

  • The new systems are standardised as daily work with a focus on sustainability and continuous improvement.

Benefits of successful solution/project implementation.

Improves collaboration and engagement with the project.

Improves data and information quality.

Improves visibility and traceability (No skeletons in the closet).

The systems can be standardised as daily work to consistently maintain improvement.

Products we suggest

Agile Boards are used to help visualize work, limit work-in-progress, and maximize efficiency. Agile boards work by letting you track any job or project through the series of steps; Backlog, Sprint, To Do, Doing, Verify, Done.

Available in 5 different colours, so you can organise colours between departments or teams!

The board comes as either a magnetic board or as self-adhesive decal, so you can reuse an old whiteboard you already have.

The escalation board is used to log and issues that have occurred as well as issue real time actions for solution implementation and management.

Available in 5 different colours, so you can organise colours between departments or teams!

The board comes as either a magnetic board or as self-adhesive decal, so you can reuse an old whiteboard you already have.

The Product Vision Board helps in the development of a new product or service outlining the goal as well as its use, needs, value and competition.

Available in 5 different colours, so you can organise colours between departments or teams!

The board comes as either a magnetic board or as self-adhesive decal, so you can reuse an old whiteboard you already have.

The Project Management Board is perfect for listing projects for the future by priority as well as displaying any active projects and their progress.

Available in 5 different colours, so you can organise colours between departments or teams!

The board comes as either a magnetic board or as self-adhesive decal, so you can reuse an old whiteboard you already have.

  • Agile Board
  • Escalation Board
  • Product Vision Board
  • Project Management Board

Case Study

Success of projects in different organisational conditions.

A study undertaken in Finland in 2006 identifies the factors critical to project implementation success or failure. The study also explores the relationships between factors and organisation background and subsequent variables. Data collection was carried out both qualitatively and quantitatively through interviews and surveys. To avoid limitations and prevent bias, the survey was generated through the analysis of previous research studies and was piloted in 5 separate organisations.

A series of different industries took part in the study, including Manufacturing, Engineering and Construction, Telecommunications Services, Software and IT, Public Administration and Education Others. Five different factor groups were identified as factors related to the project, factors related to the project leader, factors related to the project team members, factors related to the organization, and finally factors related to the environment. Three critical factors were isolated from each group as being critical to successful project implementation.

Factor groups and they’re top three most critical factors:

  • Factors related to the project:
  1. Clear goals/objectives
  2. End-user commitment
  3. Adequate funds/resources
  • Factors related to the project leader:
  1. Commitment
  2. Ability to coordinate
  3. Effective leadership
  • Factors related to the project team members:
  1. Commitment
  2. Communication
  3. Technical background
  • Factors related to the organization:
  1. Top management support
  2. Clear organization/job descriptions
  3. Project organization structure
  • Factors related to the environment:
  1. Client
  2. Technological environment
  3. Subcontractors

The three most critical factors for successful project implementation in each group were brought for further analysis regarding relationship with the organisational background. The significant relationships found were as follows; Communication was deemed more critical the bigger the organisation was in terms of turnover, while adequate funding was more critical the smaller the organisation was. Team members who had more years of experience had more end-user commitment compared to younger less experienced members. Young members also needed a more in depth job description. The more significant findings were that the factors of communication and good leadership (a member with good experience and knowledge and a talent for motivating colleagues) are most critical to successful projects. Although it can be theorised that the reason that leadership was one of the most critical factor because the project leader would effectively be the channel for good communication, project definition, organisational support among other important factors.

This study shows the importance of preparation before project implementation taking into account the degree of factors critical to a projects success as well as how such factors are interconnected.

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